Is this HSBC's new top investment banker in Hong Kong?

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Is this HSBC's new top investment banker in Hong Kong?

HSBC has been looking for a permanent replacement for Peter Enns, its former co-head of advisory and investment banking and advisory, and it might be closing to landing one.

The bank is understood to be talking to Matthew Ginsburg about a senior role within global banking. Talks are ongoing that could involve Ginsburg become global co-head of HSBC’s advisory and investment banking coverage business, based in Hong Kong, according to two sources.  HSBC declined to comment.

There’s no certainty that Ginsburg will take the role, but he has excellent credentials. 

He has been based in Hong Kong since 1992 and spearheaded Barclays’ breakneck expansion in investment banking expansion across the Asia-Pacific region when he joined from Morgan Stanley in 2009.

He stepped down from Barclays in 2014, when the lender shrank its business in the region, and later joined Fitch Ratings as chairman of Asia Pacific.

Enns left HSBC in December 2020 to take a job as CFO of US insurance company Chubb Financial.  The bank then appointed Jason Rynbeck, vice chairman of global banking and vice-chairman of the bank’s mergers and acquisitions (M&A) business in Asia, to take Enns’ role on an interim basis.

HSBC has been one of the biggest recruiters in Hong Kong as part of its ‘pivot to Asia’ strategy. HSBC’s chief financial officer Ewen Stevenson has previously admitted that the bank may have to pay up for talent as it looks to expand across Asia in both wealth management and investment.

Greg Guyett, who is HSBC’s head of global banking,  is also relocating from London as part of the strategy, along with fellow senior executives Nuno Matos and Barry O’Byrne.

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